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Introducing the RS372 Radio Stack
The RS372
TRC's Radio Stack RS372 for Flight Simulation is so realistic that you can hardly tell the difference between the simulated Radio Stack and the real Bendix King Silver Line* products. Modelled after the most popular Radio Stack, as used in the Cessna 172 Skyhawk*, all details are precisely reproduced extremely close to the exact dimensions of the original radios.

Take for example the NAV/FREQ select knob on the KX155/165A. In most todays available radio stacks, you cannot pull or push the inner knob for 25Khz in and 50Khz when in the out position. The KX155/165A radio from the RS372 Radio Stack has a full functioning frequency dial. Indeed changing the frequency in 25Khz. steps when in the “in” position and in 50Khz. steps when pulled out.

During development, the utmost attention has been paid to becoming as close to the original product – used in real aircraft – as possible.

To emulate the original radio stack closely, TRC Development uses custom made LCD’s, who produce a bright orange text on a black background, just like to original. Not like other products using standard display components, the RS372 Radio Stack displays contains indeed all special elements and signs as present on the original.

The stack is constructed as a modular system. Each radio is a separate module and connected via a ribbon cable to the Radio Stack Controller, a microprocessor board which connects to your PC via USB running Flight Simulator Software. You can therefore change the order of how the radios fit in your panel. Would you rather have the Autopilot on top? Or just one COM/NAV? The TRC Radio Stack RS372 can be made to measure by yourselve with exactly the radio's you choose. And even better: at any time in future, you can extend your stack with another module.

Since the RSC uses uploadable software via USB (which is an automatic process during start up). New software drivers will become available regularly. At this moment, the RSC Radio Stack follows all functionality of Microsoft*) Flight Simulator FS2002/2004, with already some extra additions to the functionality of some modules to come closer to the original. (You will need FSUIPC from Pete Dowson to run the RS372 with FS2004).

TRC continues their development for more functionality (which data is not available from flight simulator programs), free of charge for users of the radio stack. For example, the KX155/165A display has a built in ACTIVE/CDI (Course Deviation Indicator) format. In a few weeks this function will also be supported and new software can be downloaded from the website. The vertical “needle” can move side to side similar to a mechanical CDI. When the needle is centered, the aircraft is on the selected OBS course. When the active frequency is tuned to a VOR frequency, the center of the CDI scale displays the “TO” or “FROM” indicator.

The Radio Stack Controller (RSC) has already provisions for future expansion like a GPS module and a Moving Map module. When they become available, its just a matter of plugging in in.

For programmers, there is an SDK (Software Development Kit) available, enabling the possibility to develop interfacing to any other flight simulator software than Microsoft Flight Simulator.

All radios can be ordered separately and a full stack includes now:
- KMA28 Audio Panel
- KX155A NAV/COM (twice, us as COM1 and COM2)
- KN62A DME
- KT76CT Transponder
- KR87 ADF
- KAP140 Autopilot

The Radio Stack Controller (RSC)
The Radio Stack Controller is a micro computer board which connects to your PC via USB running Flight Simulator Software. The board has 10 connectors which receive the ribbon cable leading to each separate radio stack module. The RSC uses uploadable software via USB (which is an automatic process during start up). New software drivers will become available regularly. At this moment, the RSC Radio Stack follows all functionality of Microsoft Flight Simulator FS2002/2004, with already some extra additions to the functionality of some modules to come closer to the original. The RSC needs to be connected to a standard PC AT Power Supply, using a standard diskdrive connector which is present on the RSC. When you have already other products from TRC or SimKits and you are using the CCU, you can connect the RSC board to the same power supply as the CCU. The RSC comes with a USB cable to connect to your PC.

The KMA28 Audio Panel
The functionality of the simulated KMA28 Audio Amplifier/Intercom/Marker Beacon Receiver is extremely close to the original product. Users can identify which receivers are selected by noting which of the green switch LEDs are illuminated. Push buttons labeled Nav 1, Nav 2, DME, MKR (Marker), ADF, AUX (auxiliary), and SPR (Speaker) are "latched" type switches.

The KX155A/165A NAV/COM
A complete RSC372 Radio Stack is equipped with two KX155A/165A radios. Each of them is fully equiped with a dual display, standby and active frequency buttons, dual frequency dials, volume knobs and channel and nav select buttons. The LCD display of the module has all elements to display more functionality, like a CDI (course deviation indicator) useable in the near future via a simple software update.

KN62A DME
The unit is channeled internally with its own two concentric frequency selection knobs. The smaller of the two knobs has an “in” and an “out” position. When in the “in” position, this smaller knob changes the 0.1 MHz digit (0.0, 0.1, 0.2, etc.). When pulled “out”, it adds 0.05 MHz to the frequency and tunes in 0.1 MHz steps (0.05, 0.15, 0.25, etc.). The outer, larger knob changes the larger digits (1 MHz, 10 MHz).

KT76CT Transponder
Like other Mode A/Mode C transponders, the KT 76C replies with any one of 4,096 codes, which differ in the position and number of pulses transmitted. By “replying” to ground transmissions, your KT 76C enables ATC computers to display aircraft identification, altitude and ground speed on Enroute, Approach or Departure Control radar screens. When the IDENT button is pressed, your simulated aircraft will be positively identified to the Air Traffic Controller. The KT 76C also displays Flight Level Altitude, marked by the letters “FL” and a number in hundreds of feet, on the left side of the display.

KR87 ADF
The active frequency (to which the ADF is tuned) is displayed in the left side of the window at all times. A standby frequency is displayed in the right side when “FRQ” is annunciated. The standby frequency is placed in “blind” memory when either FLT (Flight Time) or ET (Elapsed Time) mode is selected. With “FRQ”on, the standby frequency is selected using the frequency select knobs which may be rotated either clockwise or counterclockwise. Pull the small inner knob out to tune 1’s. Push the smaller inner knob in to tune 10’s. The outer knob tunes the 100’s and the 1000’s up to 1799.

KAP140 Autopilot
The TRC autopilot simulator is based on the KAP 140 Two Axis with Altitude Preselect Operation from Honeywell, which is a rate based digital autopilot. It has a.o. annunciation indicators for Pitch Axis and Roll axis, An Autopilot engage/disengage button, selector buttons for the Heading mode, Alt mode, Navigation mode, Approach mode, Back course approach, Vertical Trim and rotary knobs for the altitude setting and autopilot baro setting.

*) Bendix King Silver Line is a brand name of Honeywell
*) Cessna 172 Skyhawk is a brand name of Textron Corp.
*) Microsoft is a brand name of Microsoft Corp.


 
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